The renaissance prince the views of machiavelli and erasmus

He is best known as an early Humanist sometimes known as "Prince of the Humanists" or "the crowning glory of the Christian Humanists"and the intellectual father of the Reformation. He was instrumental in rescuing Christian theology from the pedantries of the Scholastics.

The renaissance prince the views of machiavelli and erasmus

Two scholars who lived simultaneously during the Renaissance could be considered the principal representatives of two colossally different schools of thought, humanism and pragmatism, which may be termed diametrical opposites in many respects.

In their theories regarding government, war, toleration, and the perception of the individual, Desiderius Erasmus and Niccolo Machiavelli differed dramatically, though with a few curious convergences on certain particular issues.

All moral considerations are, according to Machiavelli, secondary or outright irrelevant. Though Machiavelli was a man of republican convictions, and a high-ranking diplomat and statesman for the Republic of Florence from tohe concerned The Prince primarily with the tactics and dynamics appropriate to an absolutist ruler.

For this end, he was willing to sacrifice the republican ideal to a strong government capable of such unification, and aimed The Prince at his former political rivals, the Medici, who had tortured him prior to his exile from Florence. As his model for an ideal ruler, Machiavelli uses Cesare Borgia, a ruthless autocrat who frequently employed tactics of treachery, deceit, conquest, and assassination to carve out a sfere of influence for himself in the Papal States.

For Machiavelli, it is more important that a ruler inspire fear in his subjects rather than love, for those who fear a ruler can be coerced to aid him when there is need, whereas those who merely admire the ruler may often be inclined against supporting him by petty interests dictating to the contrary.

Nevertheless, Machiavelli counsels rulers to avoid inspiring hatred within their subjects and thus to refrain from inflicting harm arbitrarily. Analyzing the early days of the Roman Republic, Machiavelli does not hesitate to praise virtuous acts performed by various Roman politicians, but focuses primarily on the optimal practical efficiency with which such acts can be achieved.

The Education of a Christian Prince was written partly as a retort to Machiavelli, and partly as an instruction manual to the future King Charles X of Sweden. The Erasmian ruler must primarily devote himself to administering justice to the people and abstaining from inflicting harm upon them.

According to historians like Paul Johnson, the Erasmian ideal served as inspiration for later governments, such as that of the United States, which, rather than functioning to enrich an autocracy or a ruling clique, was originally structured to protect its constituency while intervening minimally with the lives of the citizens.

The autocratic prince is, for Erasmus, the source of greatest vice. InErasmus published the Adagia Collectanae, a collection of proverbs, among them: That a state grows rich by the industry of its citizens and is plundered by the rapacity of its rulers?

That good laws are enacted by representatives of the people and violated by kings? That the commons love peace and the monarchs foment war?

The renaissance prince the views of machiavelli and erasmus

Moreover, he praises the cruelty of commanders such as Hannibal in stifling dissension within the ranks of their own men. Erasmus, on the other hand, was averse to war in nearly all situations. Erasmus was disgusted by the bilateral cruelties committed during the religious Reformation, as the Catholic Church and the Holy Inquisition persecuted Lutherans as heretics and threatened them with death, while Martin Luther and his allied German princes ordered the execution of more thanpeasants who rebelled against their rule in Erasmus considered the violent strife of the Reformation to be the greatest obstacle to peaceful scholarship and intellectual progress in his time.

He foresaw even bloodier times ahead, and warned in On the Sweet Concord of the Church, one of his last works, that a failure of the Catholics and Protestants to reconcile their differences peacefully would lead to over a century of bloodshed.Desiderius Erasmus (AKA Desiderius Erasmus Roterodamus or Desiderius Erasmus of Rotterdam) ( - ) was a Dutch philosopher and theologian of the Renaissance.

Prince"), written as advice to the young King Charles of Spain, was published in , sixteen .

Name Course Instructor Date Opposing viewpoints: The renaissance prince: the views of Machiavelli and Erasmus Machiavelli argued that a leader cannot be feared and loved at the same time, and hence a leader needs to have either of the two qualities (Spielvogel ). Machiavelli and Erasmus were both humanists, but had very different points of view. Machiavelli whose writing was from the Italian humanist’s view, when Erasmus wrote from the points of view of Christian humanist in Europe may be one of reasons for huge differences in Machiavelli’s and Erasmus’ thoughts. Machiavelli and Erasmus Compared by GENNADY STOLYAROV II Two scholars who lived simultaneously during the Renaissance could be considered the principal representatives of two colossally different schools of thought, humanism and pragmatism, which may .

The Education of a Christian Prince (Latin: Institutio principis Christiani) is a Renaissance "how-to" book for princes, by Desiderius Erasmus, which advises the reader on how to be a "good Christian" grupobittia.com book was dedicated to Prince Charles, who later became Habsburg Emperor Charles grupobittia.coms wrote the book in , the same year that .

Desiderius Erasmus, (born October 27, , Rotterdam, Holland [now in the Netherlands]—died July 12, , Basel, Switzerland), Dutch humanist who was the greatest scholar of the northern Renaissance, the first editor of the New Testament, and also an important figure in patristics and classical literature.

The renaissance prince the views of machiavelli and erasmus

Transcript of Machiavelli v Erasmus. What makes a good ruler? What is the difference between a king and a tyrant? Machiavelli () v Erasmus () Machiavelli 'The Prince' Shakespeare's message The end justifies the means?

or Honour at all times?

Niccolo Machiavelli - Renaissance and Reformation - Oxford Bibliographies

Full transcript. Often called the “prince of the humanists” Erasmus of Rotterdam () was one of the most influential European philosophers and theologians of the early modern period. However, today he is often overshadowed by his more radical contemporaries, particularly Niccolò Machiavelli, and.

Machiavelli and Erasmus were both humanists, but had very different points of view. Machiavelli whose writing was from the Italian humanist’s view, when Erasmus wrote from the points of view of Christian humanist in Europe may be one of reasons for huge differences in Machiavelli’s and Erasmus’ thoughts.

Machiavelli and Erasmus Compared - The Rational Argumentator